Unmeasured results DON'T MATTER.

Think about this statement from the “Leadership Freak”

Those who don’t enjoy measuring results, don’t enjoy achievement.

I’ve noticed that there are two types of leaders… please tell me if I’m wrong:

1.  The kind of leader that doesn’t like to measure.  They’re intimidated by measurement.  They run from it.  Either they’re afraid that something won’t work.  Or that they’ll lose their job.  Or that someone will think bad if things don’t increase by 400%.

2.  The kind of leader that LOVES to measure.  They’ll measure only because they need to know what the scorecard reads.  Are we winning?  Is this idea a loser?  Are we moving the ball down the field?

My experience…

Leaders that measure actually do move the ball down the field… consistently… but slowly.

Leaders that don’t like to measure sometimes move the ball down the field.  But they’re not quite sure why or how it happened.  They’re just happy with what they can get.  (And if they ball is not moving in the right direction, they’re many time eager to show how it was another team member’s call that caused the loss).

What kind of leader are YOU?



  • Steve gartland June 10, 2013 Reply

    An extremely myopic view, Todd. Very western. By this measure, much of Jesus` ministry lacked success.

  • Todd Rhoades June 10, 2013 Reply

    Not at all. Jesus knew exactly how many people he was feeding. Most of Jesus’ ministry was measured in some way, shape, or form.

  • Stephen Canfield June 10, 2013 Reply

    The correlation between measuring and success has to do more with the competency of a person who uses measurement to mark progress than it does with measurement as a tool. If a person is scared to measure, getting them to do so won’t make them more effective, it will just let everyone know they aren’t getting anywhere.

  • Steve Perky June 21, 2013 Reply

    Todd, thanks for sharing this post. I have seen reactions in the past from leaders who feel measurements get in the way. I have also seen leaders who swing the other way and almost worship the measurements.

    The bottom line is to do like you suggest in this post, and that is to use measurements as a tool for successfully fulfilling the goal of the team.

    It is possible to drive a car 70 miles an hour down the interstate, but without paying attention to the road signs and fuel gauge, it is possible to go nowhere really fast and become stuck in the middle of nowhere without fuel.

    I see measurements in the same way. Paying attention to the signs allows me to notice the speed limit may only be 65, I may have taken a wrong turn, and I may almost be out of gas. By using the measurements as tools, I can ensure I get where I need to go.

  • Natalie Morris June 25, 2013 Reply

    If a tree falls in the forest, and you don’t measure it, does it still fall?
    I do agree that measurements are important and insightful, but without them results still matter.

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