teamsthatthrive

Teams that Thrive: Five Disciplines of Collaborative Church Leadership

Last week, I had the opportunity to sit down with Warren Bird and Ryan Hartwig and discuss their new book on collaborative church leadership.  I think you’ll enjoy this quick, fun video interview.

So… why should you read this book when Amazon.com lists 38,927 books on “church leadership”?  That’s my first question… and Warren Bird’s answer might surprise you!

We also discuss three reasons why some people might be opposed to collaborative church leadership.

I hope you’ll check out the book.  You can order it today at Amazon (although you’d better hurry… it said there were only seven copies left in stock!)  Or check out more on the book here at TeamsThatThriveBook.com.

Here’s a short synopsis:

It’s increasingly clear that leadership should be shared—for the good of any organization andfor the good of the leader. Many churches have begun to share key leadership duties, but don’t know how to take their leadership team to the point where it thrives. Others seriously need a new approach to leadership: pastors are tired, congregations are stuck, and meanwhile the work never lets up. But what does it actually mean to do leadership well as a team? How can it be done in a way that avoids frustration and burnout? How does team leadership best equip the staff and bless a congregation? What do the top church teams do to actually thrive together? Researchers and practitioners Ryan Hartwig and Warren Bird have discovered churches of various sizes and traditions throughout the United States who have learned to thrive under healthy team leadership. Using actual church examples, they present their discoveries here, culminating in five disciplines that, if implemented, can enable your team to thrive. The result? A coaching tool for senior leadership teams that enables struggling teams to thrive, and resources teams doing well to do their work even better.

 

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