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This is the first I’d heard of this… but it happened this past Easter: “Don’t Go To Church” – the words are blunt and meant to spark a reaction. The controversial message has been popping up all over Fayetteville – on newspaper ads, billboards, T-shirts and online – but the message has a hidden meaning, those responsible say. “I’ve worn the T-shirt. I’ve had people telling us we’re going to hell,” said Jeff Isenhour, pastor of Arran Lake Baptist Church. “Church is not a place you go. Church ought to be who we are.” Isenhour says his congregation is trying to reach out to those with no church home. Instead of going to traditional church on Easter Sunday, they are asking people to come to J.P. Riddle Stadium for a non-traditional service. Those who go to the event “won’t feel out of place. No one will be judging what you’re wearing, shaking your hand with a plastic smile or telling you how good it is to finally see you again,” according to a video posted on the group’s site, DontGoToChurch.org. // read more here… I did something like this once that ticked people off. When our church started a Saturday morning service, I (probably stupidly) ran an ad on the church page of the paper that had the headline: “Sleep in on Sunday Mornings”.  (the copy then said to join us on Saturday night.  Talk about an almost fireable offense.  🙂 Here you can see that video the church posted of the event last Easter.  Nearly 3,000 people attended: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=titeCMvGaGE
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Leadership
For a small group of people—perhaps just 1% to 3% of the population—sleep is a waste of time. Natural “short sleepers,” as they’re officially known, are night owls and early birds simultaneously. They typically turn in well after midnight, then get up just a few hours later and barrel through the day without needing to take naps or load up on caffeine. They are also energetic, outgoing, optimistic and ambitious, according to the few researchers who have studied them. The pattern sometimes starts in childhood and often runs in families. While it’s unclear if all short sleepers are high achievers, they do have more time in the day to do things, and keep finding more interesting things to do than sleep, often doing several things at once. Nobody knows how many natural short sleepers are out there. “There aren’t nearly as many as there are people who think they’re short sleepers,” says Daniel J. Buysse, a psychiatrist at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and a past president of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, a professional group. Out of every 100 people who believe they only need five or six hours of sleep a night, only about five people really do, Dr. Buysse says. The rest end up chronically sleep deprived, part of the one-third of U.S. adults who get less than the recommended seven hours of sleep per night, according to a report last month by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. via The Sleepless Elite – WSJ.com. How much sleep do YOU get?
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