Your address will show here +12 34 56 78
Leadership, Leadership, Start Here
You have to read this post from Seth Godin about things you could do rather than watch TV. In fact, he gives a long list of things that are better than watching TV. Clay Shirky calls this using your ‘cognitive surplus’.  It’s what you do in our off-time without squandering your off-time. You can read Seth’s post here. So… what do YOU do with your cognitive surplus? Todd
0

Leadership, Leadership, Start Here
Seth Godin:  Make a decision.  It doesn’t have to be a wise or perfect one.  Just make one. Here’s what Seth writes:

It doesn’t have to be a wise decision or a perfect one. Just make one.

In fact, make several. Make more decisions could be your three word mantra.

No decision is a decision as well, the decision not to decide. Not deciding is usually the wrong decision. If you are the go-to person, the one who can decide, you’ll make more of a difference. It doesn’t matter so much that you’re right, it matters that you decided.

Of course it’s risky and painful. That’s why it’s a rare and valuable skill.

Seriously, Pastor.  Make a decision.  Don’t be stupid, but do make a decision.  Stop your teetering.  Pick a side.  Be decisive. Seriously, Church leader.  Make a call.  The facts will never ALL be in.  The situation will never be perfect to make the perfect decision. And most decisions have some inherent risk involved.  That’s ok.  Risk is a good thing. So… you’ve got five minutes.  Just make the decision. And you know exactly which decision I’m talking about.  The one that’s been dogging you for days, even weeks or months.  Should I do this, or should I do that? Most decisions do not take weeks or months. If you need to… start out slow.  Small decision.  Any decision.  Just make one. I’d love to hear what decision you’ve made, or what decision you’ve been putting off.  Anyone transparent enough to share?  (You can do so confidentially if you like on this post). todd PS — You can read more of Seth Godin’s stuff here.  It’s all excellent!
1

Leadership
As a church leader, have you ever encountered someone in your church with an agenda?
We all have.  In fact, we ALL have an agenda.  You have one.  I have one. A good definition of criticism is this:  when agendas collide. How do you respond when you’re criticized or given advice? Seth Godin writes… keep reading
1

Leadership
“You’re right, we were wrong” I’m trying to remember the last time I EVER heard a church say something to this effect. That’s probably because most churches only operate out of what is safe… thus there’s very little chance of being wrong. Read these words from Seth Godin over a couple of times, and let them sink in… keep reading
1

Leadership
Seth Godin wrote something recently that I think is totally true.
Successful people fail often, and, worth noting, learn more from that failure than everyone else.
I have the opportunity to work with a ton of really healthy churches… and  I can tell you that this is a value in each and everyone one of them. Every one of them fails. And every one of them learns from their failures so that they can do better next time. If you look at failure as a negative in your ministry, you probably won’t fail much. And if you don’t fail much, you probably won’t get much right either. This ‘reaching people’ stuff is important stuff.  We need to be willing to stick our necks out there, risk a little, and see what works.  If we don’t, we’re destined to only more of the same. via Seth’s Blog: How to fail. Thoughts?
[facebook]
 
1

Leadership
Seth Godin writes:  Everyone is famous to 1,500 people. Some people are even famous to 3,000. And that’s a fascinating new phenomenon. When there are 3,000 or 10,000 or 500,000 people who think you’re famous…it changes things. The race to be slightly famous is on, and it’s being fueled by the social and tribal connections permitted by the net. We give a lot of credit and faith to the famous, but now there are a lot more of them. Over time, once everyone is famous, that will fade, but right now, the trust and benefit of the doubt we accord the famous is quite valuable. via Seth’s Blog: Famous to the family. As a pastor and church staff member… you’re famous.  It might be to 50 people or 10,000. It really doesn’t matter. Those people know you.  And because of your position, most of them trust you. That’s a heavy thing when you think about it. Think about it. How do you feel about famous people?  You need to know, because you are one of them!
[facebook]
  How does this thinking change the way you go about your day?
5

1.  Are we on the same team? 2.  What’s the right path forward? These are questions that Seth Godin posed in a post this morning. His point is that many times we ask the second question about the path; while the most important question is the first one:  Are we on the same team? Here is the right track to look at when asking the team question: Is this a matter of respect?  Power?  Do you come out ahead if I fail?  Has someone undercut you? Do we both wat the same thing to happen here? Answer those questions FIRST; then, if all goes well… ask the path question. According to Seth:
If you feel disrespected, the person you disagree with is not going to be a useful partner in figuring out what the right path going forward might be. If one party (employee/customer/investor) only wins when the other party loses, what’s the point of talking about anything but that? Deal with the agenda items and the dignity problems first before you try to work out the right strategic choices.
I think that’s great advice. Todd  
1

Leadership
Some of Seth Godin’s posts are the shortest. This one had me thinking this morning. Here’s the concept:  We all say that we’re ok to fail.  It’s ok if we try something new and it doesn’t work out ok… we’ll just try something else. But very few of us are willing to risk anything in the process, other than a little bit of time or money. Here’s a quote Seth shares from David Chang:
“We’re hoping to succeed; we’re okay with failure. We just don’t want to land in between.”
Seth’s response: He’s serious. Lots of people say this, but few are willing to put themselves at risk, which destroys the likelihood of success and dramatically increases the chance of in between. Ouch. I don’t want to be ‘in between’. Kind of reminds me of New Testament “luke-warm”. And we know what happens if we’re luke-warm. Thoughts? Read more here…  
2

Leadership
This quote from Seth Godin has me thinking today:
If you think you have no choice but to do what you do now, you’ve already made a serious error.
As you go about your day, leading in the most important organization known to man, the church, don’t make a serious error of thinking that you have to do everything they way you did it yesterday or last week. You don’t. In fact… if you do… you may be making a SERIOUS error. More here.
0

Leadership
“If your plan will only succeed if there is no turbulence at any time, it’s probably not a very good plan (either that or you’re not going anywhere interesting.)” -Seth Godin Link I learned this lesson again yesterday.  It really made me think about where I was going.  I sure DO want it to be interesting. How about you.  Where are you planning on going in 2012? Do you expect turbulence? And how will you react when the journey gets a little bumpy?
1

PREVIOUS POSTSPage 1 of 2NO NEW POSTS