Your address will show here +12 34 56 78
Leadership
Teresa Griffith writes:  Sometimes, we can feel particularly paralyzed about making a decision, and can end up postponing and procrastinating on it until it is “made for us.” This is a terrible cop-out; even when you choose not to make a decision, you are making it anyway. Leaving something to fate is not as random as you think — and stepping back from the act of deciding makes you feel out of control, passive, and disempowered. You might even avoid a decision so you can play the victim later, a role that is never proactive or helpful for your personal growth. keep reading
1

Leadership
This quote from Seth Godin has me thinking today:
If you think you have no choice but to do what you do now, you’ve already made a serious error.
As you go about your day, leading in the most important organization known to man, the church, don’t make a serious error of thinking that you have to do everything they way you did it yesterday or last week. You don’t. In fact… if you do… you may be making a SERIOUS error. More here.
0

Leadership
“If your plan will only succeed if there is no turbulence at any time, it’s probably not a very good plan (either that or you’re not going anywhere interesting.)” -Seth Godin Link I learned this lesson again yesterday.  It really made me think about where I was going.  I sure DO want it to be interesting. How about you.  Where are you planning on going in 2012? Do you expect turbulence? And how will you react when the journey gets a little bumpy?
1

Leadership
A very interesting study has come out about powerful people and their decision making ability. Seems that their decisions making process could have one big flaw: The decisions made by powerful people in business and other fields have far-reaching effects on their organizations and employees. But this study finds a link between having a sense of power and having a propensity to give short shrift to a crucial part of the decision-making process: listening to advice. Power increases confidence, the paper’s authors say, which can lead to an excessive belief in one’s own judgment and ultimately to flawed decisions. Previous research has shown that the quality of decision making declines when people hew too much to their own beliefs and discount too readily the advice of others; outside information helps “average out” the distortions that can result when people give a great deal of weight to their own opinions and first impressions. This paper is among the first to examine whether power — defined as an individual’s “capacity to influence others, stemming in part from his or her control over resources, rewards, or punishments” — reduces or increases a person’s willingness to heed advice. via The Decision-Making Flaw in Powerful People. //So, in other words, the more power and confidence you have (hello pastors and church leaders… I’m talking to you)… the more you may rely on yourself to make good decisions. You may not ask or heed other’s advice. You may not even prayerfully consider your decisions. Cause you’ve got the expertise and clout to pull it off. Right? I think this happens more often than we admit in the church world. People get confident and make decisions. Many times they backfire. QUESTION:  How do you make tough decisions?  Are you cocky enough to think you always know best?  Do you ask others on your team for their input?  Do you seek God? Take some time and think about that today. I’d love, as always, to hear your comments below. Todd
4

Leadership
As a leader, sometimes you just have to say no.  Sometimes it’s just a bad idea.  Sometimes is actually something that is good but it would cost too much time or effort.  Sometimes, you have to say no to good things that just don’t fit your mission.  But regardless, NO is a hard word for many ministry leaders to say. Michael Hyatt has some suggestions on how to make saying NO much easier: 1.  Never say YES on the spot. 2.  Don’t feel like you need to give a long list of excuses. 3.  Commit to no more than one major and one minor volunteer responsibility at a time. 4.  Keep in mind you do not have to say yes just because you are capable. 5.  Hit the delete button when guild sneaks in. Some of these points are more for saying no to personal things that you’re being asked to do, but most of them fit for things to consider as you constantly bombarded as a leader with things that other people would like to have you do. You can read more here at Michael’s blog… [box type=”info”]How have you learned to say no? When do you say no? And what was the last ministry decision you said NO to?[/box] Todd
1