How to Reorganize Your Church Without Freaking People Out

Dan McCarthy thinks that you can change an organization without freaking people out.

People freak out in churches all the time.

And change makes many people totally freak.

When congregants freak out, they leave.

Or they make waves (which, in turn, freaks out a whole new group of people).

And, I might add, I’ve seen a few pastors freak out in my day as well.

So… how do you make changes without everyone getting their underwear in a wad?

According to McCarthy, the first step in changing an organization takes a little bit of organization.  A plan. A well-thought-out-plan.

Many (many) leaders just try to change things without a plan.

That freaks people out.

To tell you the truth… that freaks me out when a leader does that.

Here are Dan’s steps for a ‘change plan’:

1. Start with a strategy. 
It’s critical to know where the organization or team is going – what’s important, what’s not, what are the goals, etc…. While this may sound obvious, it’s an often overlooked step. Don’t have a strategy? Then maybe it’s time to create one before you start messing with the organization chart. Structure should always follow strategy. A new organization chart is not a strategy!

2. Develop your criteria.
List the problems you are trying to solve and/or opportunities. Then weight (High, Medium, Low) each one. This becomes the criteria that you’ll use to evaluate design alternatives and to measure your success.

3. Develop and evaluate design alternatives.
I’ve seen a lot of teams fall in love with one idea and then spend all of their time trying to justify it or make it perfect. Instead, try to come up with multiple alternatives (3-4), and then rank those against your criteria. The reality is none of the options will ever be perfect – there will always be trade-offs and risks.

Take the best one, and then come up with action plans to mitigate the risks.

This is also a good time to discuss other alternatives that DON’T involve reorganizing. Sometimes, the best change is no change.

4. Test the final design with scenarios.
Spend time testing the design by discussing how various business processes would work within the new structure. These “what if” discussions help fine tune the structure and clarify roles.

Let’s be frank.

Freaking people out is not good leadership.

Sure… you’ll always have people that won’t go along with your plan, won’t like your plan, or (honestly) won’t like you.  But a plan will at least give these people your rationale for the changes you are trying to make.

So… don’t just make changes… make a plan to make the changes, over time, with as many people on board.

There’s no need to freak out here, people.  🙂


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