Pastor: Stop thinking your people are just like you… they're not.

I really like the post that Michael Lukaszewski posted yesterday.  He talks about how pastors always think that the people in their churches are just like them.

The reality is… they’re not.

Here are some of Michael’s examples:

They don’t know who John Piper or Steven Furtick are.  They are confused when you quote them without context.

They aren’t familiar with their Bibles.  When you say, “You know…like it says in First Timothy,” they absolutely don’t know.

They don’t work in a Christian environment.  They aren’t surrounded by Christians who love worship music and some have bosses who are jerks.

They don’t go to conferences.  It’s a way of life for many church leaders, but the most people don’t do it.

They don’t go to church every week.  This might be the biggest of all.  You’re there every week; they are not.

Here are some more differences…

Here some additional ones that I’d add:

1.  They don’t have a clue what you do all week, and they probably think you make too much money.

2.  They expect totally different things from you than the way you are spending your day today.

3.  For 90% of your attenders, the next time they think about you or your church is the next Sunday morning or Saturday night… and the thought is “Am I going to get up and go to church?”

4.  They think you’ve got a pretty easy job.  You think you have the hardest job in the world.

What would YOU add to the list?

5 Comments

  1. Hal
    • Chuck
  2. Chuck

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