Goodbye Desktop

The percentage of emails opened on a mobile device has risen from just 4% in May 2009 to 20% in May 2011 while desktop client usage has declined by 11%. Webmail has shown the least change over two years, with a 4% decline.

via Users abandoning desktop email clients for mobile, study reports – Mobile.

Is this true for you?

I have to say… it probably is for me.  I check my email all the time on my phone.

Very rarely do I respond to email via my phone, unless:

1.  It’s urgent; or

2.  I will be away from my desktop/laptop for an extended period of time.

How about you?  Do you rely more and more on your mobile device when it comes to email communication?

Todd

3 Comments

  • Rod Gauthier June 23, 2011 Reply

    I agree, Todd. I check and then respond if its urgent or I won’t be at my laptop for a while. I still find that using my Blackberry is not as easy as my laptop, but that may change as new technology comes along.

  • carl June 23, 2011 Reply

    Depends on the email. I use email for conversations that are important enough that I want to keep a record. Otherwise most folks I know just text.

    So I get lots of emails about things I can reply to with a couple words.

    I have not used Outlook yet this year. We switched to google hosted email and I exclusively use my EVO or the web client for all email. Great not to be tied to a single computer.

  • Eric Frisch June 24, 2011 Reply

    I’m basically in the same boat as you – I read email on my phone all the time, but hardly ever respond that way unless it’s something that can get by with a one or two sentence response. Normally I wait until I’m back at the computer.

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