Are you famous?

Seth Godin writes:  Everyone is famous to 1,500 people.

Some people are even famous to 3,000.

And that’s a fascinating new phenomenon. When there are 3,000 or 10,000 or 500,000 people who think you’re famous…it changes things.

The race to be slightly famous is on, and it’s being fueled by the social and tribal connections permitted by the net. We give a lot of credit and faith to the famous, but now there are a lot more of them. Over time, once everyone is famous, that will fade, but right now, the trust and benefit of the doubt we accord the famous is quite valuable.

via Seth’s Blog: Famous to the family.

As a pastor and church staff member… you’re famous.  It might be to 50 people or 10,000.

It really doesn’t matter.

Those people know you.  And because of your position, most of them trust you.

That’s a heavy thing when you think about it.

Think about it.

How do you feel about famous people?  You need to know, because you are one of them!

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How does this thinking change the way you go about your day?

5 Comments

  • Michelle Wegner March 8, 2011 Reply

    Great post. I think about Rob’s “fame” in our community as it has to do with our kids. They think everyone, everywhere knows their dad. This is both a good thing and a bad thing..I think. They are always having to share their dad with people they don’t know. I think they’re mostly ok with it so far, not sure I am! 🙂

  • Michael March 8, 2011 Reply

    This opens up a whole can of worms about the pros and cons of celebrity in ministry. I have heard a lot of good arguments on this over the past year.

  • rbud March 8, 2011 Reply

    Wrong premise from the start. “Everyone” is not “famous” to 1500 people. Some people aren’t famous to anyone, but more likely infamous to 1500. I think to define “famous” in this way puts the standard for fame at an extremely low level so as to be inpurtinent and meritless. I’m famous to only about 4: my wife, my 2 kids and my dog. Everything else is relative, and since I’m not getting any particular public accolades, I’d be hard pressed to call myself famous at any level, much less to 1500 people.

  • Cliff March 8, 2011 Reply

    “Famous” is an unfortunate word choice here, because it is tied to the idea of “celebrity” and a whole host of other issues that can detract from the truly important point: everyone “influences” others… for good or bad, whether it’s 4, 50, or 1,500 people. It’s the way God has created us. We are communal beings and we are much more connected than we think.

    What kind of influence am I having on others? That’s a good question to ask and meditate on. I personally think we should embrace the truth of our influence and connectedness (it’s there even if we refuse to admit it, and it’s not reserved just for “leaders”), and pray that God’s Kingdom and will are done through us towards others, no matter our particular context.

  • Rob June 5, 2011 Reply

    I’m not famous, i’m infamous!

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