Do you know your neighbor?

Often times we find ourselves dreaming big dreams, setting lofty goals, and launching grand strategies for reaching out to our communities… when we don’t even know our neighbors.

In their book Faithmapping: A Gospel Atlas for Your Spiritual Journey, Barry Montgomery and Mike Cosper suggest that before pursuing the grand strategies, we may want to do life with those who live closest to us first.

How have YOU most effectively reached out to YOUR neighbors?

MB_do-you-know-your-neighbor

2 Comments

  • Ben Simpson March 1, 2013 Reply

    We’ve lived in our neighborhood for about six years. Finally, this Christmas we made goodies for all of our immediate neighbors, with the intention of introducing ourselves and giving our phone number. Later, our daughter made Valentines for a few of our neighbors, and we handed those off. Before then, all contact with our neighbors had been brief hellos on the street. We found that three of our neighbors are widows, and during the recent snowstorm in Kansas City, we made sure to reach out and check on them.

  • leeleonardLeonard March 4, 2013 Reply

    I usually meet most of my neighbors within a week or so of moving, either us or them. Several of our neighbors have met Christ over the years, God is big!

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