What churches can learn from nuclear subs

Ok, so a nuclear submarine and a church don’t seem to have a whole awful lot in common… at first.

Take a closer look, and you will find two complex organizations loaded with similar leadership challenges. While the mission of the local church is not to go around sinking enemy vessels (in case you were wondering), the need for church leadership to develop and maintain a healthy organizational culture focused on expanding God’s Kingdom is remarkably similar to the duties of a submarine’s senior officers as they set out on their mission to defend our country.

Today we feature a special interview with David Marquet, a retired captain in the United States Navy, and the author of Turn the Ship Around! The way David went around totally redefining the culture of the USS Sante Fe is an excellent blueprint for pastors engaging in church revitalization work.

Today, I am excited to share a conversation between David, Matt Steen, and me. Over the course of fifteen minutes, we share a little bit about the story of the Santa Fe, how David’s view of leadership changed over the course of his career, and what a pastor needs to know when entering a church context that is in need of revitalization.

Click below to watch the video, and let me know what you think:

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