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59% of Americans Have NO Easter Plans

A recent study done by Ed Stetzer and Lifeway Research points to a decline in church attendance on Easter for Americans. The study suggests that 41% of Americans are planning on attending services on Easter, 39% will not be attending, and 20% are undecided.

This morning we debate the meaning of this, how churches can learn from this study, and what this says about the culture we find ourselves in.

What do YOU expect attendance to look like at Easter this year?

Link

Todd



2 Responses to “ “59% of Americans Have NO Easter Plans”

  1. Gary Ellis says:

    We are expecting a typical attendance which will probably be overfull since this is what has been happening lately with us. However, I don’t believe the lack of Easter attendance has as much to do with the “heathenization” of the country as it does how non-relevant the glitz and glam church has become. People who are truly seeking are looking for something that will connect them to God in a powerful way; rather than another entertaining show in the name of being Christian.

  2. James says:

    Dear Todd;
    Thank you for some statistics on what is happening in our land. There is trend moving away from traditional “church”. As per your report you post a couple months ago, there are churches rising in attendance. One of those is right here in my home town. And I can tell you what our friend wrote above about the glitz is probably true. It’s a pretty glitzy, glamorous, entertaining church. But they have it, so why not.
    Personally I’m tired of all of it. I wouldn’t be going anywhere this Sunday except I was asked to play the organ, and assist the worship team and soloist.
    No I’m not a heathen, or given up on places where true spirituality take place.
    I’m just tired of the same stuff that try to attract people to come to church. Some do a fine, beautiful job of entertaining the congregation. Others not so well.
    For me I’m more about connecting, and building relationships with people, and that happens largely at dinners, potlucks, the coffee table etc.
    The nation is no worse or better. What I see are people leaving traditionalism for something far more important. And church doesn’t seem to be one of those important factors. Not making a judgement other than this is what I see. We try so hard to attract people, when I think we can be more about being a friend, helper, spiritual guide to folks out in the world.
    Just me perspective and experience.
    Blessings on your Easter celebration
    James

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